Here on Badass Lady Creatives, most of the emphasis is placed on the work: “this person is awesome, and here’s the evidence”. Our latest addition to the directory, Ash Huang (aka @ashsmash), has certainly done lovely things in interaction design and illustration:

Ash Huang | on Badass Lady Creatives

Pinterest mobile web screens

Ash Huang | on Badass Lady Creatives

Pinterest illustrations

Ash Huang | on Badass Lady Creatives

Pinterest illustrations

Ash Huang | on Badass Lady Creatives

Metamarkets brand refresh

That being said, I’m drawn not only to her work, but also the way Ash has organized the index of her portfolio site:

Ash Huang | on Badass Lady Creatives

Breaking that down, it’s color-coded projects—along with blog posts—organized by year. There’s a few things I appreciate about this:

  • The timeline acts as a visual resume; it demonstrates very clearly, “what have you been up to since joining the design industry?”
  • Blog posts often get buried on back-pages of said blogs: read once and forgotten. Here Ash has chosen the most important features and personal reflections to support her work. They’re given new life.
  • People who look at design see tons of great work, and it’s easy to forget who this work belongs to. By turning her portfolio into a narrative experience, Ash is effectively building her personal brand. This is the human behind the design.
  • Even though organizing projects into a timeline suggests confidence in her abilities, the simplicity of the design protects this portfolio from venturing into the land of self-importance. Not flashy—subtle.

This post probably seems pretty left-field, particularly to those who have already figured out their own methods of organization. But it could be a good exercise for those currently stressing over online presentation: how can you use the content you already have to create new meaning? Ash’s site is proof that you can tell a story and still keep the work highly accessible—and there’s a whole range of opportunity between “grid of square images” and “over-the-top gimmicks”.

Have you found another interesting way to organize your portfolio content? Leave a link to your site in the comments!